Drone Reading List – Critical Work

Below you’ll find a reading list assembling a range of critical work on drones and drone technology I’ve put together over the past month or two.  It’s inspired largely by the Critical Algorithm Studies reading list that Tarleton Gillespie and Nick Seaver put together, as well as the Queer STS list that Mitali Thakor and others are compiling.  I’ve found both of these lists really helpful and inspiring, so I wanted to put something similar together that might in turn offer something of this sort to others.

The usual caveats apply:  this is a list of generally critical work of myriad kinds, so essentially all the industry, technical, or jingo-y literature is absent.  It collects English-language work (lol ~surprise~).  It’s by nature a piecemeal and growing thing put together by a single, positioned person; I tried to be relatively exhaustive about what’s out there at this point in 2016, but I have undoubtedly missed certain works.  If I have, please tell me and I’ll add it!  I am especially looking for more artistic work and journalism of note along these lines.

The categorizations here are fast and loose; I decided to go with big, broad groups rather than the endless sub-categories I felt tempted to make.  That said, if you think there’s good reason to group a bunch of materials together under a new heading, don’t hesitate to say so!

UPDATE (10/18/16):  I have updated, added to and extensively recategorized this list.  I’ve included a series of sub-headings while trying to keep them as broad and inclusive as possible, because the way I had it before felt dumb and hard to navigate.  There’s also a table of contents now.

As you’ll see, there’s a fair amount of potential overlap between a bunch of these categories, and probably some don’t make sense.  & of course, classification is always a weirdly violent and stupid thing, so in recategorizing these I am guilty of both;  please, if anyone included on this list thinks they’d be better-sited elsewhere, or if anyone has ideas about different classifications or categories, don’t hesitate to tell me!

 

Drone Reading List – Critical Work | Originally assembled by Christopher Miles (chrimile@indiana.edu) | Dept. of Communication and Culture & the School of Informatics, Indiana University | September, 2016

THANKS be to Kyle Grayson, Jutta Weber, Kareem Estefan, Frank Sauer, Andrea Gill, Lila Lee-Morrison, Mitali Thakor, Eden Medina, Anita Chan, and Luke Stark, who have all added to, reshaped, or otherwise contributed to this list in a way that has made it better, more useful, and more complete

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. OVERVIEWS / BOOKS AIMED AT POPULAR AUDIENCES

II.  HISTORIES

a. General

b. Periodized

c. Critical

III.  CULTURE, THEORY, & ONTOLOGY

a. Power & identity; gender, race, politics, imperialism

b. Ontology & geist

c. Theory & critique; culture & discourse

d. Technology & media

IV.  NON-MARTIAL ROLES & DOMESTICATED DRONES

a. Border drones

b. Farm drones

c. Police drones

d. Privacy & surveillance

e. Drones and environment/wildlife

V.  WARFARE AND MILITARIZED DRONES

a. Targeted & “signature” killing

b. Living under drones

c. Space, surveillance, visuality, & position

d. Technology & materiality

e.  Nomos of drone war

e. Drone operators

VI.  LAW, POLICY, ETHICS AND RIGHTS

a. Law & legal issues

b. Policy & recommendations

c. Ethics, Rights, & critique

d. Reports

VII.  GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS AND LEGISLATION

a. Legislation

b. Congressional Research Service reports

c. DoD material

d. Other

VIII.  JOURNALISM

IX.  ART

a. Cinema

b. Visual

c. Textual

X.  COLLECTED VOLUMES

XI.  SPECIAL ISSUES

XII.  CONFERENCES

XIII.  SYLLABI

XIV.  OTHER RESOURCES

 

      I. OVERVIEWS / BOOKS AIMED AT POPULAR AUDIENCES

Benjamin, Medea. 2012. Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control. New York: OR Books.

Cockburn, Andrew. 2015. Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins. New York: Henry Holt.

Mindell, David.  2015.  “War.”  In Our Robots, Ourselves:  Robotics and the Myths of Autonomy.  New York:  Viking.

Rogers, Anne and John Hill. 2014. Unmanned: Drone Warfare and Global Security. Toronto: Pluto Press.

Shaker, S.M. 1988. War Without Men: Robots on the Future Battlefield. Elmsford: Pergamon Books.

Singer P.W. 2010. Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century. London: Penguin.

Sloggett, Dave. 2014. Drone Warfare: The Development of Unmanned Aerial Conflict. Barnsley: Pen and Sword Books.

Whittle, Richard. 2014. Predator: The Secret Origins of the Drone Revolution. New York: Henry Holt.

 

      II. HISTORIES

      a. General

Howeth, L.N. 1963. History of Communications-Electronics in the United States Navy. Washington: Government Printing Office.

Newcome, Lawrence. 2004. Unmanned Aviation: A Brief History of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Reston: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Werrell, Kenneth P. 1985. The Evolution of the Cruise Missile. Maxwell AFB Alabama: Air University Press.

Zaloga, Stephen. 2008. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Robotic Air Warfare 1917-2007. Oxford: Osprey.

      b. Periodized

Chandler, Kate. 2015. “A Bee With An Electronic Brain; Drone Flights in Cold War America.” Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development. Vol 6, no. 2. 309-316.

Everett, H. R. 2015. Unmanned Systems of World Wars I and II. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Farquharson, John. 2002. “Interwar British Experiments with Pilotless Aircraft.” War in History. Vol. 9, no 2. 197-217.

Packer, Jeremy and Joshua Reeves. 2013. “Romancing the Drone: Military Desire and Anthropophobia from SAGE to Swarm.” Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol. 38. 309-331.

Pearson, Lee. “Developing the Flying Bomb.” Naval History and Heritage Command. 70-73. https://www.history.navy.mil/content/dam/nhhc/research/histories/naval-aviation/naval-aviation-in-world-war-i/pdfs/ww1-10.pdf

Satia, Priya. 2014. “Drones: A History of the British Middle East.” Humanity. Vol. 5, no. 1. 1-31

      c. Critical

Bloomberg, Ramon. 2015. “Dancing to a Tune: The Drone as Political and Historical Assemblage.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Kindervater, Katharine. 2016. “The emergence of lethal surveillance; Watching and killing in the history of drone technology.” Security Dialogue. Vol. 47, no. 3. 223-238.

 

III. CULTURE, THEORY, & POWER

      a. Power & identity; gender, race, politics, imperialism

Allinson, Jamie.  2015.  “The Necropolitics of Drones.”  International Political Sociology.  Vol. 9, no. 2.  113-27.

Bayard de Volo, Lorraine. 2016. “Unmanned? Gender Recalibrations and the Rise of Drone Warfare.” Politics & Gender. Vol. 12, no. 1. 50-77.

Chandler, Katharine. 2012. “5,000 Feet is the Best: Re-Viewing the Politics of Unmanned Aircraft Systems.” Knowledge Politics and Intercultural Dynamics. Vol. 5.1. 63-74.

Daggett, Cara. 2016. “Drone Disorientations: How ‘Unmanned’ Weapons Queer the Experience of Killing in War.” International Feminist Journal of Politics. Vol. 17, no. 3. 361-379.

Davis, Charles. 2012. “Drone-Court Advantage.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 73-79.

Kosek, Jake. 2010. “Ecologies of Empire: On the New Uses of the Honeybee.” Cultural Anthropology. Vol. 25, no. 4. 650-678.

Kreps, Sarah. April-June 2014. “Flying under the radar: A study of public attitudes towards unmanned aerial vehicles.” Research and Politics. 1-7.

Madar, Chase. 2012. “Search for a Method.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 89-99.

Manjikian, Mary. 2014. “Becoming Unmanned.” International Feminist Journal of Politics. Vol. 16, no. 1. 48-65.

Parks, Lisa. 2016. “Drones, Vertical Mediation, and the Targeted Class.” Feminist Studies. Vol. 42, no. 1. 227-235.

Sandvik, Kristin Bergtora. 2015. “African Drone Stories.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 73-96.

Thomsen, Mike. 2012. “Vagina Analogues.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 63-71.

      b.Ontology & geist

Chamayou, Gregorie. 2015. A Theory of the Drone. New York: New Press.

Crandall, Jordan. 2013. “Ontology of the Drone.” In Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal: Drone: The Automated Image. Ed. by Paul Wombell. Berlin: Kerber.

Holmqvist, Caroline. 2013. “Undoing War: War Ontologies and the Materiality of Drone Warfare.” Millennium – Journal of International Studies. Vol. 41, No. 3. 535–552.

Gharavi, Maryam Monalisa. 2012. “Paranoid Androids.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 22-39.

Mellamphy, Dan and Nandita Biswas Mellamphy. 2015. “Welcome to the Electrocene, an Algorithmic Agartha.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

McNeil, Joanne and Ingrid Burrington. 2014. “Droneism.” Dissent. Vol. 61, no. 2. 57-60.

Noys Benjamin. 2015. “Drone Metaphysics.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Rothstein, Adam. 2015. Drone (Object Lessons). London: Bloomsbury Academic.

Vasko, Timothy. 2011. “Human, not too Human: A Critical Semiotic of Drones and Drone Warfare.” Master’s thesis, University of Victoria.

      c. Theory & critique; culture & discourse

Brady, Sara. 2015. “God, the Pilot, and the Bugsplat.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 34-54.

Coley, Rob and Dean Lockwood. 2015. “As Above, So Below: Triangulating Drone Culture.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Delmont, Matt. 2013. “Drone Encounters; Noor Behram, Omer Fast, and Visual Critiques of Drone Warfare.” American Quarterly. Vol. 65, no. 1. 193-202.

Gregory, Thomas.  2015.  “Drones, Targeted Killings, and the Limitations of International Law.”  International Political Sociology.  Vol. 9, no. 3.  197-212.

Jablonowski, Maximilian. 2015. “Drone It Yourself! On the Decentring of ‘Drone Stories.’” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Krasmann, Susanne and Jutta Weber. 2015. “Editorial.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 3-11.

Neary, Mike. 2015. “Educative Power: The Myth of Dronic Violence in a Period of Civil War.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Schaberg, Christopher. 2012. “Missing Captain.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 81-87.

Schwarz, Elke. 2016. “Prescription drones: On the techno-biopolitical regimes of contemporary ‘ethical killing.’” Security Dialogue. Vol. 47, no. 1. 59-75.

Selchow, Sabine. 2015. “The Drones of Others: An Insight into the Imagination of UAVs in Germany.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 55-72.

Sutherland, Dane. 2015. “Vaporents: Inhuman Orientations.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Yehya, Naief. 2015. “Perspective: The Drone: God’s Eye, Death Machine, Cultural Puzzle.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Walters, William.  2014.  “Parrhēsia Today: Drone Strikes, Fearless Speech and the Contentious Politics of Security.”  Global Society.  Vol. 28, no. 3. 277-99.

      d. Technology & media

Deane, Cormac. 2015. “The Control Room: A Media Archaeology.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Iñesta, Eva Parra. 2015. “Perspective: Vague Ideas, Clear Images.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

McCosker, Anthony. 2015. “Drone Media: Unruly Systems, Radical Empiricism and Camera Consciousness.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Weber, Jutta. 2016. “Keep adding. On kill lists, drone warfare and the politics of databases.” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space. Vol. 34, no. 1. 107-125.

  

    IV. NON-MARTIAL ROLES & DOMESTICATED DRONES

Baker, Alexander. 2015. “Provocation: Unmanned Aerial Realtors.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Bolman Brad. 2015. “Provocation: A Prairie Drone Companion.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Barry, Tom. 2013. “Drones Over the Homeland: How Politics, Money and Lack of Oversight Have Sparked Drone Proliferation, and What We Can Do.” Center for International Policy. 1-40.

Goldberg, David, Mark Corcoran and Robert Picard. 2013. “Remotely Piloted Aircraft & Journalism: Opportunities and Challenges of Drones in News Gathering.” Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Oxford.

Kakaes, Konstantin, Faine Greenwood, Mathew Lippincott, Shannon Dosemagen, Patrick Meier, and Serge Wich. 2015. Drones and Aerial Observation; new technologies for property rights, human rights, and global development. New America. http://www.newamerica.org.

      a. Border drones

Barry, Tom. 2010. “Fallacies of High-Tech Fixes For Border Security.” Center for International Policy. 1-11.

Crandall, Jordan. 2013. “Ecologies of the Wayward Drone.” In From Above: War, Violence, Verticality. Edited by Tarak Barkawi and Shane Brighton. 263-282.

Harris, Malcolm interviewing Alex Rivera. 2012. “Border Control.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 6-20.

      b. Farm drones

Upchurch, Emily. 2015. “Drone on the Farm: The Benefits and Controversies Surrounding the Future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Agriculture.” Drake Law Review. Vol. 20, no. 2. 310-336.

      c. Police drones

Neocleous, Mark.  2013.  “Air Power as Police Power.”  Environment and Planning D: Society and Space.  Vol. 31, no. 4.  578-93.

      d. Privacy & surveillance

Rosen, Lea. 2012. “Flight for Your Rights.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 50-61.

      f. Drones and environment/wildlife

 

      V. WARFARE AND MILITARIZED DRONES

      a. Targeted & “signature” killing

Carvin, Stephanie. 2013. “The Trouble With Targeted Killing.” Security Studies. Vol. 21. 529-559.

Gholiagha, Sassan. 2015. “Individualized and Yet Dehumanized? Targeted Killing via Drones.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 127-153.

Grayson, Kyle.  2012.  “Six Theses on Targeted Killing.”  Politics.  Vol. 32, no. 2.  120-28.

Grayson, Kyle.  2016.  Cultural Politics of Targeted Killing:  On Drones, Counter-Insurgency, and Violence.  Abingdon:  Routledge.

Zehfuss, Maja. 2011. “Targeting: Precision and the production of ethics.” European Journal of International Relations. Vol. 17, no. 3. 543-566.

      b. Living under drones

Shaw, Ian and Majed Akhter. 2012. “The Unbearable Humanness of Drone Warfare in FATA, Pakistan.” Antipode. Vol. 44, no. 4. 1490-1509.

Tahir, Madiha R. 2012. “Louder Than Bombs.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 101-110.

      c. Space, surveillance, visuality, & position

Gregory, Derek. 2011. “From a View to a Kill; Drones and Late Modern War.” Theory, Culture & Society. Vol. 28, no. 7-8. 188-215.

Gregory, Derek. 2014. “Drone Geographies.” Radical Philosophy. Vol. 183. 7-19.

Krishnan, Armin. 2015. “Mass Surveillance, Drones, and Unconventional Warfare.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 12-33.

Lila Lee-Morrison. 2015. “Drone Warfare: Visual Primacy as a Weapon.” In Transvisuality: The Cultural Dimension of Visuality, Volume 2: Visual Organisations. Edited by Tore Kristensen, Anders Michelsen, and Frauke Wiegand. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press. 201-214.

Nasir, Muhammad Ali. 2015. “Droning, zoning and organizing: Kafkaesque reflections on the of the earth in the northwestern tribal belt of Pakistan”. Space & polity. Vol. 19, no. 3. 273-292.

Stahl, Roger. 2013. “What the drone saw: the cultural optics of the unmanned war.” Australian Journal of International Affairs. Vol. 67, no. 5. 659-674.

Wall, Tyler and Torin Monahan. 2011. “Surveillance and violence from afar: The politics of drones and liminal security-scapes.” Theoretical Criminology. Vol. 15, no. 3. 239-254.

Williams, Alison.  2011.  “Enabling persistent presence? Performing the embodied geopolitics of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle assemblage.”  Political Geography.  Vol. 30, no. 7.  381-90.

Williams, John. 2015. “Distant Intimacy; Space, Drones, and Just War.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 93-110.

      d. Technology & materiality

Gilli, Andrea & Mauro Gilli. 2016. “The Diffusion of Drone Warfare? Industrial, Organizational, and Infrastructural Constraints.” Security Studies. Vol. 25, no. 1. 50-84, DOI: 10.1080/09636412.2016.1134189

Timm, Trevor and Parker Higgins. 2012. “Nobody Knows You’re a Drone.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 41-48.

Sharkey, Noel and Lucy Suchman. 2014. “Wishful Mnemonics and Autonomous Killing Machines.” AISB Quarterly. No. 136. 14-22.

Suchman, Lucy. 2015. “Situational Awareness: Deadly Bioconvergence at the Boundaries of Bodies and Machines.” MediaTropes. Vol. V, no. 1. 1-24.

Walters, William. 2014. “Drone strikes, dingpolitik and beyond: Furthering the debate on materiality and security.” Security Dialogue. Vol. 45, no. 2. 101-118.

      e. Nomos of drone war

Boyle, Michael. 2013. “The Costs and Consequences of Drone Warfare.” International Affairs. Vol. 89, no. 1. 1–29

Enemark, Christian. 2013. Armed Drones and the Ethics of War: Military virtue in a post-heroic age. New York: Routledge.

Gusterson, Hugh. 2014. “Toward an Anthropology of Drones: Remaking Space, Time, and Valor in Combat.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 191-206

Gusterson, Hugh. 2016. Drone: Remote Control Warfare. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Hasain, Marouf. 2015. “The Drone Wars Over Pakistan and the Aerial ‘Manhunts’ for Taliban and Al-Qaeda Enemies.” In Forensic Rhetorics and Satellite Surveillance: The Visualization of War. Lanham: Lexington Books. Chapter 5, 127-160.

Kaag, John and Sarah Kreps. 2014. Drone Warfare (War and Conflict in the Modern World). Cambridge: Polity.

Shaw Ian and Majed Akhter. 2014. “The Dronification of State Violence.”   Critical Asian Studies. Vol. 46, no. 2. 211-234.

Shaw, Ian. 2013. “Predator Empire: The Geopolitics of US Drone Warfare.” Geopolitics.   DOI:10.1080/14650045.2012.749241

Shaw, Ian. 2016. Predator Empire: Drone Warfare and Full Spectrum Dominance. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

      f. Drone operators

Asaro, Peter M. 2013. “The labor of surveillance and bureaucratized killing: new subjectivities of military drone operators.” Social Semiotics. Vol. 23, no. 2. 196-224.

Cullen, Timothy.  2011.  “The MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft : humans and machines in action.”  PhD thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Policante, Amedeo. 2012. “Game of Drones: Cubicle Warriors and the Drudge of War.” Nyx, a nocturnal. Issue 7: Machines. 110-115.

 

      VI. LAW, POLICY, ETHICS AND RIGHTS

      a. Law & legal issues

Bergen, Peter and Daniel Rosenthal (ed.). 2014. Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, and Policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Marouf, Hasain. 2016. Drone Warfare and Lawfare in a Post-Heroic Age. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Ryan, Klem. 2014. “What’s Wrong with Drones? The Battlefield in International Humanitarian Law.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 207-223.

      b. Policy & recommendations

Buchanan, Allen and Robert Keohane. 2015. “Toward a Drone Accountability Regime.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 15-37.

Buchanan, Allen and Robert Keohane. 2015. “Toward a Drone Accountability Regime – A Rejoinder.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 67-70.

Crawford, Neta. 2015. “Accountability for Targeted Drone Strikes Against Terrorists?” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 39-49.

Dill, Janina. 2015. “The Informal Regulation of Drones and the Formal Legal Regulation of War.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 51-58.

Wetham, David. 2015. “Targeted Killing; Accountability and Oversight via a Drone Accountability Regime. Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 59-65.

Zenko, Micah. 2013. Reforming US Drone Strike Policies. Council on Foreign Relations Special Report no. 65. http://www.cfr.org/wars-and-warfare/reforming-us-drone-strike-policies/p29736.

Zenko, Micah and Sarah Kreps. 2014. Limiting Armed Drone Proliferation. Council on Foreign Relations Special Report no. 69. http://www.cfr.org/drones/limiting-armed-drone-proliferation/p33127.

      c. Ethics, Rights, & critique

Asaro, Peter. 2012. “On banning autonomous weapon systems: Human rights, automation, and the dehumanization of lethal decision-making. International Review of the Red Cross. Vol. 94, no. 886. 687–710.

Council of Europe Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights. 2015. Drones and Targeted Killings: the need to uphold human rights and international law. Parliamentary Assembly. F – 67075 Strasbourg Cedex. 1-14.

Krasmann, Susan. 2012. “Targeted Killing and its Law; On a Mutually Constitutive Relationship.” Leiden Journal of International Law. Vol. 25, no. 3. 665-682.

Leander, Anna. 2013. “Technological Agency in the Co-Constitution of Legal Expertise and the US Drone Program.” Leiden Journal of International Law. Vol. 26, no. 4. 811-831.

McNeal, Gregory. 2014. “Targeted Killing and Accountability.” The Georgetown Law Review. Vol. 102. 681-794.

O’Connell, Mary Ellen. 2014. “Banning Autonomous Killing: The Legal and Ethical Requirement That Humans Make Near-Time Lethal Decisions.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 224-236.

Pugliese, Joseph. 2013. State Violence and the Execution of Law; Biopolitical Caesura of Torture, Black Sites, Drones. New York: Routledge.

      d. Reports

Columbia Law School Human Rights Clinic. 2013. Counting Drone Strike Deaths. http://web.law.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/microsites/human-rights-institute/files/COLUMBIACountingDronesFinal.pdf.

Columbia Law School Human Rights Clinic & The Center for Civilians in Conflict. 2012. The Civilian Impact of Drones: Unexamined Costs, Unanswered Questions. http://civiliansinconflict.org/uploads/files/publications/The_Civilian_Impact_of_Drones_w_cover.pdf.

Horowitz, Michael, Sarah Kreps and Matthew Fuhrmann. 2016. “The Consequences of Drone Proliferation: Separating Fact from Fiction.” Available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2722311.

International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic at Stanford Law School and the Global Justice Center at NYU School of Law. 2012. “Living Under Drones – Death, Injury, and Trauma to Civilians From US Drone Practices in Pakistan.” http://www.livingunderdrones.org

 

      VII. GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS AND LEGISLATION

      a. Legislation

Joint Resolution to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the United States. Public Law 107-40. U.S. Statues at Large 115 (2001): 224-225.

“Operation and Certification of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Final Rule.” Federal Register. Vol. 81, no. 124. 6/8/2016. Pp. 42064-42214

      b. Congressional Research Service reports

Bone, Elizabeth and Christopher Bolkom. April 25, 2003. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Background and Issues for Congress (CRS Report No. RL31872). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service.

Haddal, Chad and Jeremiah Gertler. July 8, 2010. Homeland Security: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Border Surveillance (CRS Report No. RS21698). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service.

      c. DoD material

U.S. Department of Defense. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles 1994 Master Plan.

U.S. Department of Defense. 2013. Unmanned Systems Integrated Roadmap. Ref. no. 14-S-0553.

 

      VIII. JOURNALISM

Becker, Jo and Scott Shane. 5/29/2012. “Secret ‘Kill List’ Proves a Test of Obama’s Principles and Will.” New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/world/obamas-leadership-in-war-on-al-qaeda.html

Carpenter, Shaikhouni and Lina Shaikhouni. 2011. “Don’t Fear the Reaper: four misconceptions about how we think about drones.” Foreign Policy. http://foreignpolicy.com/2011/06/07/dont-fear-the-reaper/

Reed, Betsy, editor-in-chief. 2015. “The Drone Papers.” The Intercept. https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/

Mayer, Jane. 10/26/2009. “The Predator War:   What are the risks of the C.I.A.’s covert drone program?” The New Yorker. http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/10/26/the-predator-war

Savage, Charlie. 10/8/2011. “Secret U.S. Memo Made Legal Case to Kill a Citizen.” New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/09/world/middleeast/secret-us-memo-made-legal-case-to-kill-a-citizen.html?_r=0

 

      IX. ART

      a. Cinema

Fast, Omar. 2011. 5,000 Feet is the Best. 30min   http://commonwealth-projects.com/project/omer-fast-5000-feet-is-the-best/#film

Greenwald, Robert. 2013. Unmanned: America’s Drone Wars. 63min.

Nova. “Rise of the Drones.” 52min. http://video.pbs.org/video/2326108547/.

Tahir, Madiha. 2013. Wounds of Waziristan. 26min http://woundsofwaziristan.com/

      b. Visual

HKW. Forensis. http://www.hkw.de/en/programm/projekte/2014/forensis/start_forensis.php

Murmuration: a Festival of Drone Culture. http://murmurationfestival.tumblr.com/

Pater, Ruben. 2014. Drone Survival Guide. http://www.dronesurvivalguide.org/

We are not a bug splat

      c. Textual

Goodyear, Sarah. “Imagining a Drone-Proof City.” The Atlantic Cities. 4/6/13. http://m.theatlanticcities.com/politics/2013/02/imagining-drone-proof-city/4606/

Plastique Fantastique. 2015. “Monarch Drone Communiqué.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Seidenberg, Michael. 2012. “Unsolicited Advice for Living in the End Times.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 127-131.

Silverman, Jacob. 2012. “A Drone By Any Other Name.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 112-126.

Wombell, Paul. 2013. Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal: Drone: The Automated Image. Berlin: Kerber.

 

       X. COLLECTED VOLUMES

Bashir, Shahazad and Robert D. Crews. 2012. Under the Drones: Modern Lives in the Afghanistan-Pakistan Borderlands. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

 

Shahzad Bashir and Robert D. Crews: Introduction

  1. Amin Tarzi: Political Struggles over the Afghanistan-Pakistan Borderlands
  2. Gilles Dorronsoro: The Transformation of the Afghanistan-Pakistan Border
  3. Sana Haroon: Religious Revivalism across the Durand Line
  4. James Caron: Taliban, Real and Imagined
  5. Shah Mahmoud Hanifi: Quandaries of the Afghan Nation
  6. Thomas Ruttig: How Tribal Are the Taliban?
  7. Lutz Rzehak: Ethnic Minorities in Search of Political Consolidation
  8. Faisal Devji: Red Mosque
  9. Tahir Andrabi, Jishnu Das, and Asim Ijaz Khwaja: Madrasa Statistics Don’t Support the Myth
  10. Farzana Shaikh: Will Sufi Islam Save Pakistan?
  11. Jamal J. Elias: The Politics of Pashtun and Punjabi Truck Decoration
  12. Nushin Arbabzadah: The Afghan Mediascape
  13. Fariba Nawa: Women and the Drug Trade in Afghanistan

Shahzad Bashir and Robert D. Crews: Epilogue

Cortright, David, Rachel Fairhurst and Kristen Wall, editors. 2015. Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict: Ethical, Legal, and Strategic Implications. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

  1. David Cortright and Rachel Fairhurst: Assessing the Debate on Drone Warfare
  2. Jennifer M. Welsh: The Morality of “Drone Warfare”
  3. Dr. Martin L. Cook: Drone Warfare and Military Ethics
  4. Mary Ellen O’Connell: International Law and Drone Attacks beyond Armed Conflict Zones
  5. Karen J. Greenberg: Drone Strikes and the Law
  6. Pardiss Kebriaei: Justifying the Right to Kill
  7. Audrey Kurth Cronin: The Strategic Implications of Targeted Drone Strikes for US Global Counterterrorism
  8. Patrick B. Johnston: Security Implications of Drones in Warfare
  9. David Cortright and Rachel Fairhurst: Winning without War
  10. Mary Dudziak: Targeted Killings and Secret Law
  11. Chris Woods: Understanding the Gulf between Public and US Government Estimates of Civilian Casualties in Covert Drone Strikes
  12. Rafia Zakaria: The Myth of Precision
  13. Conclusion. David Cortright and Rachel Fairhurst: The Future of Drone Warfare

 

Evangelista, Matthew and Henry Shue. 2014. The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical and Legal Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Note: only three chapters in this volume focus on drones. These are listed below

Gusterson, Hugh. 2014. “Toward an Anthropology of Drones: Remaking Space, Time, and Valor in Combat.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 191-206

Ryan, Klem. 2014. “What’s Wrong with Drones? The Battlefield in International Humanitarian Law.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 207-223.

O’Connell, Mary Ellen. 2014. “Banning Autonomous Killing: The Legal and Ethical Requirement That Humans Make Near-Time Lethal Decisions.” In The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical Norms From Flying Fortresses to Drones. Edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 224-236.

Strawser, Bradley Jay, editor. 2013. Killing by Remote Control: The Ethics of an Unmanned Military. New York: Oxford University Press.

Foreword: Jeff McMahan

  1. Bradley J. Strawser: Introduction: The Moral Landscape of Unmanned Weapons
  2. Matthew Hallgarth: Just War Theory and Remote Military Technology: A Primer
  3. Asa Kasher and Avery Plaw: Distinguishing Drones: An Exchange
  4. David Whetham: Drones and Targeted Killing: Angels or Assassins?
  5. Robert Sparrow: War without Virtue?
  6. Zack Beauchamp and Julian Savulescu: Robot Guardians: Teleoperated Combat Vehicles in Humanitarian Military Intervention
  7. Avery Plaw: Counting the Dead: The Proportionality of Predation in Pakistan
  8. Rebecca J. Johnson: The Wizard of Oz Goes to War: Unmanned Systems in Counterinsurgency
  9. Uwe Steinhoff: Killing Them Safely: Extreme Asymmetry and Its Discontents
  10. George R. Lucas, Jr.: Engineering, Ethics & Industry: the Moral Challenges of Lethal Autonomy
  11. Stephen Kershnar: Autonomous Weapons Pose No Moral Problem

Završnik, Aleš, editor. 2016. Drones and Unmanned Aerial Systems: Legal and Social Implications for Security and Surveillance. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

  1. Aleš Završnik: Introduction: Situating Drones in Surveillance Societies
  2. Mark Andrejevic: Theorizing Drones and Droning Theory
  3. Kristin Bergtora Sandvik:  The Political and Moral Economies of Dual Technology Transfers: Arming Police Drones
  4. Primož Gorkič: The (F)utility of Privacy Laws: The Case of Drones?
  5. Sanja Milivojevic: Re-bordering the Peripheral Global North and Global South: Game of Drones, Immobilising Mobile Bodies and Decentring Perspectives on Drones in Border Policing
  6. Luisa Marin and Kamila Krajčíková:  Deploying Drones in Policing Southern European Borders: Constraints and Challenges for Data Protection and Human Rights
  7. Mélanie De Groof: Death from the Sky: International Legal and Practical Issues on the Use of Armed Drones
  8. Vasja Badalič: The Predators’ Rule of Terror
  9. Pablo Mendes de Leon and Benjamyn Ian Scott: An Analysis of Unmanned Aircraft Systems Under Air Law
  10. David Goldberg: Droning on About Journalism: Remotely Piloted Aircraft and Newsgathering
  11. Aleš Završnik: Drones, Resistance and Countersurveillance

 

       XI.  SPECIAL ISSUES

*not quite special issue*

“Symposium – Toward a Drone Accountability Regime.” 2015. Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1.

Buchanan, Allen and Robert Keohane. 2015. “Toward a Drone Accountability Regime.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 15-37.

Crawford, Neta. 2015. “Accountability for Targeted Drone Strikes Against Terrorists?” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 39-49.

Dill, Janina. 2015. “The Informal Regulation of Drones and the Formal Legal Regulation of War.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 51-58.

Wetham, David. 2015. “Targeted Killing; Accountability and Oversight via a Drone

Accountability Regime. Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 59-65.

Buchanan, Allen and Robert Keohane. 2015. “Toward a Drone Accountability Regime – A Rejoinder.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 67-70.

Williams, John. 2015. “Distant Intimacy; Space, Drones, and Just War.” Ethics & International Affairs. Vol. 29, no. 1. 93-110.

Coley, Rob and Dean Lockwood, eds. 2015. Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16. http://www.culturemachine.net/index.php/cm/issue/view/28.

Coley, Rob and Dean Lockwood. 2015. “As Above, So Below: Triangulating Drone Culture.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Noys Benjamin. 2015. “Drone Metaphysics.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Baker, Alexander. 2015. “Provocation: Unmanned Aerial Realtors.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Yehya, Naief. 2015. “Perspective: The Drone: God’s Eye, Death Machine, Cultural Puzzle.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Bloomberg Ramon. 2015. “Dancing to a Tune: The Drone as Political and Historical Assemblage.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

McCosker, Anthony. 2015. “Drone Media: Unruly Systems, Radical Empiricism and Camera Consciousness.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Deane, Cormac. 2015. “The Control Room: A Media Archaeology.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Jablonowski, Maximilian. 2015. “Drone It Yourself! On the Decentring of ‘Drone Stories.’” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Bolman Brad. 2015. “Provocation: A Prairie Drone Companion.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Iñesta, Eva Parra. 2015. “Perspective: Vague Ideas, Clear Images.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Neary, Mike. 2015. “Educative Power: The Myth of Dronic Violence in a Period of Civil War.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Sutherland, Dane. 2015. “Vaporents: Inhuman Orientations.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Mellamphy, Dan and Nandita Biswas Mellamphy. 2015. “Welcome to the Electrocene, an Algorithmic Agartha.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Plastique Fantastique. 2015. “Monarch Drone Communiqué.” Culture Machine. Special Issue: “Drone Culture.” Vol. 16.

Krasmann, Susanne and Jutta Weber, eds. 2015. Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2.

Krasmann, Susanne and Jutta Weber. 2015. “Editorial.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 3-11.

Krishnan, Armin. 2015. “Mass Surveillance, Drones, and Unconventional Warfare.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 12-33.

Brady, Sara. 2015. “God, the Pilot, and the Bugsplat.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 34-54.

Selchow, Sabine. 2015. “The Drones of Others: An Insight into the Imagination of UAVs in Germany.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 55-72.

Sandvik, Kristin Bergtora. 2015. “African Drone Stories.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 73-96.

Gholiagha, Sassan. 2015. “Individualized and Yet Dehumanized? Targeted Killing via Drones.” Behemoth: A Journal on Civilisation. Special Issue: “Game Changer? On the Epistemology, Ontology and Politics of Drones.” Vol. 8, no. 2. 127-153.

Rosenfelt, Rachel, ed. 2012. The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6.

Harris, Malcolm interviewing Alex Rivera. 2012. “Border Control.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 6-20.

Gharavi, Maryam Monalisa. 2012. “Paranoid Androids.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 22-39.

Timm, Trevor and Parker Higgins. 2012. “Nobody Knows You’re a Drone.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 41-48.

Rosen, Lea. 2012. “Flight for Your Rights.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 50-61.

Thomsen, Mike. 2012. “Vagina Analogues.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 63-71.

Davis, Charles. 2012. “Drone-Court Advantage.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 73-79.

Schaberg, Christopher. 2012. “Missing Captain.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 81-87.

Madar, Chase. 2012. “Search for a Method.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 89-99.

Tahir, Madiha R. 2012. “Louder Than Bombs.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 101-110.

Silverman, Jacob. 2012. “A Drone By Any Other Name.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 112-126.

Seidenberg, Michael. 2012. “Unsolicited Advice for Living in the End Times.” The New Inquiry. Special Issue: “Game of Drones.” No. 6. 127-131.

 

       XII. CONFERENCES

Drone War Symposium. July 2015. Indiana University.

As Above so Below – A colloquium on drone culture. May 2014. University of Lincoln.

 

       XIV. SYLLABI

 

        XV. OTHER RESOURCES

Drone Research Network: http://drone-research-network.org/

-Mailing list for sharing drone-related resources; network of international scholars doing critical work on drones

Center for the Study of the Drone: http://dronecenter.bard.edu/

-Bard College located organization with both a really useful weekly news update email & a website full of further resources

Yale Law: Targeted Killings and Drone Attacks. http://library.law.yale.edu/news/targeted-killings-and-drone-attacks

-Exhaustive (far more than this list!) aggregation of legal commentary and government documents on military drones, particularly targeted killing

Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI): http://www.auvsi.org/home

-Major professional and lobbying organization for drones in the US. Hosts several conferences, and puts out periodic reports on drone technology, policy, and economics/industry. Much of its major data and serious analyses are behind a steep paywall, but the shorter reports are free.

 

One thought on “Drone Reading List – Critical Work

  1. Professor Sir Michael Aaronson says:

    Great initiative; many thanks!
    May I draw to your attention the following edited collection:
    Aaronson M, Aslam W, Dyson T, Rauxloh R. (2014) Precision-Strike Technology and International Intervention. Strategic, ethico-legal and decisional implications.. Abingdon : Routledge, Taylor & Francis
    It will also point you in the direction of of a number of other scholars working on these issues.
    Many thanks,
    Mike Aaronson

    Like

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